Category Archives: Remote People

Waugh and the Horn

Another article has appeared contrasting Evelyn Waugh’s dismissive attitude toward Djibouti in the 1930s with the bustling activity there today. This is entitled “Scramble for the Horn” by Oliver Miles in the London Review of Books: Evelyn Waugh, who passed through … Continue reading

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Two Openings and a Debut

A Waugh quote opens an article in the South China Morning Post about Djibouti: Not that long ago, Djibouti was known for little more than French legionnaires, atrocious heat and being at the other end of a railway line to … Continue reading

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Waugh’s 1930

An anonymous Spanish-language blogger posting on picapicaweb has written a series of six brief articles tracing Evelyn Waugh’s movements in the year 1930. “Pica pica” is the scientific word for magpie, and the blogger claims to pick up those bits of information … Continue reading

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Waugh and the African Railways

The Sueddeutsche Zeitung published in Munich has a feature story (“Afrika-Express”) by Bernd Doerries about the expansion of the railway networks in East Africa financed by the Chinese. Most recently, this involves the opening of a new line in Kenya from … Continue reading

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Waugh Included in Ethiopia Collection

An excerpt from Waugh’s 1931 travel book Remote People has been included in a recent collection of writings about Ethiopia. The book, recently reviewed in the TLS,  is edited by Yves-Marie Stranger and is entitled Ethiopia: through writers’ eyes. The … Continue reading

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Addis Ababa Today

The Guardian in a feature-length article by Jason Burke in its “Cities” series describes the growing unrest in Ethiopia. This has its roots in the country’s land ownership policies under which the government owns all the land and allows development only … Continue reading

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Waugh Watering Hole Rescued by Villagers

The Abingdon Arms in the Oxfordshire village of Beckley has been rescued by the efforts of the villagers. They have taken ownership and, according to the Oxford Times, will soon have the pub reopened for business: The Abingdon Arms is a … Continue reading

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New Service on Djibouti-Addis Ababa Railway

The New York Times has announced opening of service on the new railway line from Djibouti to Addis Ababa (including videos of opening ceremony and trains): The 10:24 a.m. train out of Djibouti’s capital drew some of the biggest names … Continue reading

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Waugh in Happy Valley

A recent story in the Tatler recounts the present day difficulties of the British aristocrats and their descendants who settled in that country’s area known as Happy Valley during the days of the Empire. The story centers on three members of … Continue reading

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Waugh and the New American Racists

An article in the Mexican newspaper El Economista addresses the deveopment of a new form of racism in the United. After years of melting together, as immigrants came in from the south to join those already there from Europe, Africa … Continue reading

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