Category Archives: Festivals

Brideshead 75th Anniversary Festival Announced

Castle Howard has announced the dates of its festival next summer to celebrate the 75th anniversary of the publication of Brideshead Revisited. This will be held at the Castle Howard estate in North Yorkshire from Friday 26th June to Monday … Continue reading

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BBC’s 100 Novels that Shaped Our World

The BBC has announced its list of 100 novels that shaped our world in advance of Friday’s public panel discussion at the British Library. See previous post. The panel of 7 were asked “to choose 100 genre-busting novels that have … Continue reading

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Lost Girls (More)

Waugh biographer Paula Byrne has reviewed DJ Taylor’s new book Lost Girls: Love, War and Literature 1939-1951. This appears in today’s Times newspaper. Byrne stresses that the book is as much or more about Cyril Connolly as it is about … Continue reading

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Waugh in the North

Three country houses in the north of England, all with Waugh connections, are about to hold events that may be of interest: –This weekend at Stonyhurst College, a Jesuit boarding school in Lancashire, there will be a Festival of Literature … Continue reading

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Scoop in Chipping Campden

Duncan McLaren has posted a report of his presentation on Waugh’s Scoop at last week’s literary festival in Chipping Campden. His talk took the lively audience through the novel with Waugh at their sides. It was supported with numerous relevant … Continue reading

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Waughlandias

The Australian online journal Traveller.com has posted an article inspired by the latest (and final) series of Game of Thrones. That story is set in the imaginary Seven Kingdoms of Westeros, and the article’s author Ute Junker moves from that … Continue reading

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Others in Abyssinia

Duncan McLaren has posted a new chapter (“In Search of Scoop”) on his website relating to Waugh’s second trip to Abyssinia in 1935. This is based on the book Waugh in Abyssinia but is supplemented by the writings of three … Continue reading

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Literary Chagford

The following paragraphs open a recent story in The Moorlander, a local Dartmoor area newspaper: Chagword, Dartmoor’s Literary Festival, [was held last] weekend with big named authors coming to the festival in Chagford, but literary links go much further back, … Continue reading

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Details Released of Waugh Event at Chipping Campden Festival

The Chipping Campden Literary Festival to be held in May has released more details of its event entitled “Scoop: We Need to Talk About Evelyn”. This is scheduled for Friday, 10 May at 830pm in the Chipping Campden School Hall. … Continue reading

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A Wavian Christmas, or Two

Magnus Linklater begins his Christmas column in The Times by looking at how noted diarists from the past have marked the holiday: Christmas does not always bring out the best in us — but did it ever? Diarists of the … Continue reading

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