Tag Archives: Daily Mail

Haphazard Dust-bins

Spanish novelist Imma Monsó has written an article inspired by the publication in Spanish of US novelist James Salter’s The Art of Fiction. Salter’s book is based on a series of 2014 lectures he gave at the University of Virginia … Continue reading

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Craig Brown’s 100 Favorites

The Daily Mail has published a list of humorist Craig Brown’s 100 favorite books. He explains that these are not necesarily his picks for “greatest” books but those he most enjoyed reading and would recommend to a friend. It is … Continue reading

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Waugh Biographer Target of Poison Pen

Paula Byrne, is well known in this parish for her 2009 “partial life” of Waugh, Mad World: Evelyn Waugh and the Secrets of Brideshead. She has also appeared and submitted papers at two Waugh conferences, one of which was notably presented in … Continue reading

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Waughs: Comedy and Fitness

An article has been posted entitled “Evelyn Waugh’s Comic Muse in Scoop”. This is by Dr Robert Hickson and is available on the weblog Catholicism.org. The article opens with the posting of Waugh’s introduction to the 1963 edition of Scoop … Continue reading

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Roundup: From Seven Deadly Sins to Four Brandy Alexanders

–The Spanish newspaper El Mundo has a story about the career of novelist Ian Fleming, best known for his James Bond novels and films. This begins with a discussion of Fleming’s less well-known role as International Editor of The Sunday … Continue reading

Posted in A Handful of Dust, Brideshead Revisited, Essays, Articles & Reviews, Evelyn Waugh, Letters, Men at Arms, Newspapers | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

“Churchill’s Secret Affair” to Air in TV Documentary

The Daily Mail has a feature length story on what may have been a secret (but brief) affair between Lady Castlerosse (born in humble circumstances as Doris Delevigne) and Winston Churchill. This took place (if it did) in spring 1930 … Continue reading

Posted in Evelyn Waugh, Letters, Newspapers, Television Programs, World War II | Tagged , , , , , | 3 Comments

New Year’s Roundup

A recent review in The Times of Tina Brown’s new book The Vanity Fair Diaries opens with this: “Where you see zippy, zesty lesbian Jewesses bubbling with new ideas, I see plodding, ill-mannered, bottomlessly earnest boobies . . . I do not … Continue reading

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Corker and Shumble ReBooted

Simon Parry writing in the South China Morning Post offers a retelling of Waugh’s parody of journalists reset in the jungles of today’s Papua New Guinea. He is hired by an unnamed London Sunday paper to cover the story of … Continue reading

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A Handful of Monopoly

Tom Utley writing in the Daily Mail compares the board game of Monopoly to the ending of Waugh’s novel A Handful of Dust. He recalls a disastrous holiday in the Scottish isles where his family endured endless rainfall in a … Continue reading

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Waugh and Powell in the Spectator

The Spectator has posted a podcast in which Hilary Spurling, author of the recent biography of Anthony Powell, discusses the book with Sam Leith, the Spectator’s literary editor. Near the end of the interview Spurling is comparing the lives and … Continue reading

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