Category Archives: World War II

Joan Didion Reviews Sword of Honour

In an article posted on the website Acculturated, Nic Rowan discusses novelist and essayist Joan Didion’s early career of reviewing books for the National Review in the 1960s. Rowan claims that her later career cannot be fully understood without considering … Continue reading

Posted in Evelyn Waugh, Men at Arms, Newspapers, Sword of Honour, Unconditional Surrender/The End of the Battle, World War II | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

The Waughs and the Leigh Fermors

Two recent books about Patrick Leigh Fermor (Paddy) and his wife Joan include material about their interactions with Evelyn Waugh, his wife Laura, and their mutual friends: The first is Joan: The Remarkable Life of Joan Leigh Fermor by Simon Fenwick. Evelyn … Continue reading

Posted in Diaries, Evelyn Waugh, Letters, Sword of Honour, Waugh Family, World War II | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

Put Out More Rabans

The London Review of Books has published a biographical description of his father’s experience in the early days of WWII by Jonathan Raban. One of the few literary allusions in the article is Raban’s reference to Evelyn Waugh’s Put Out … Continue reading

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Waugh and his Enemies: Hugh Trevor-Roper

In advance of the lecture (“Waugh’s Enemies”) scheduled for next Monday, 25 September at Hertford College, Oxford, the University of Leicester has posted a brief article about what will surely be one of the topics. This is by Milena Borden … Continue reading

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Virginia’s Little Problem

An article on the anti-abortion website LifeSite News considers descriptions of abortions in literature and notes, not surprisingly, that most of them are rather down beat. This is written by Jonathan Van Maren and is entitled “There are no happy … Continue reading

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Alan Hollinghurst on Henry Green (and Evelyn Waugh)

Novelist Alan Hollinghurst has reviewed several of Henry Green’s novels (the first six, I believe) in New York Review of Books. This is in connection with the republication of Green’s books by the NYRB’s book subsidiary. In addition to the … Continue reading

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Churchill, the “Sham Augustan”

Winston Churchill’s reputation seems to be enjoying yet another renaissance. This may be due to political leadership fatigue in the English-speaking world. A recent book and two films are the latest examples of Churchilliana. An issue of The Tablet from earlier … Continue reading

Posted in Essays, Articles & Reviews, Letters, Newspapers, Sword of Honour, World War II | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Waugh and Lodwick and Ludovic

D J Taylor in this week’s Spectator reviews a book about the life of a post-war British writer named John Lodwick. This is A Forgotten Man by Geoffrey Elliott and depicts a prolific writer of over a score of books whose … Continue reading

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Two Hitchenses on Waugh

Articles on Waugh by brothers Christopher and Peter Hitchens have recently been resurrected on the internet. These are Christopher’s essay “The Permanent Adolescent” which originally appeared in The Atlantic magazine for April 2003 and was later collected in Arguably. This is now … Continue reading

Posted in A Little Learning, Articles, Evelyn Waugh, Newspapers, Put Out More Flags, Sword of Honour, Waugh Family, World War II | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on Two Hitchenses on Waugh

Waugh and Mussolini

The Tablet has published a review of two new books about Benito Mussolini, Italy’s Fascist dictator in the 1930s and Hitler’s ally in WWII. The review by Robert Carver opens with this summary of Mussolini’s reputation in Britain before the war: In … Continue reading

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