Category Archives: Fiction

4th of July Roundup

–Duncan McLaren has added a coda to his recent posting about Waugh’s friendship (if that’s the right word) with Cyril Connolly. Duncan’s article is entitled “Cyril in Full Flow” and ┬áis based on a visit Cyril made to Berlin in … Continue reading

Posted in A Handful of Dust, Art, Photography & Sculpture, Brideshead Revisited, Discussions, Interviews, Newspapers | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Three Country Houses in the Telegraph

Writing in the Daily Telegraph, Rupert Christiansen describes three post war novels that each celebrated the English country house in a different way. The first was Waugh’s Brideshead Revisited. According to Christiansen: …its reception was largely enthusiastic and its sales … Continue reading

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Waugh and the 1945 General Election

Waugh returned to England via Italy from his assignment in Yugoslavia on 15 March 1945. He devoted the last few weeks in Italy to stirring up opposition to the new Communist regime of Marshall Tito. He spent most of the … Continue reading

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Summer Solstice Roundup

–Peter Quennell may be having a revival. Duncan McLaren (see previous post) has now been joined by A N Wilson in recounting his career. Wilson in a memoir posted by The Oldie discusses several first hand meetings he had with … Continue reading

Posted in Anniversaries, Brideshead Revisited, Letters, Newspapers, Rossetti: His Life and Works | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Harold Acton (and Martin Green)

Duncan McLaren has added Harold Acton to Waugh’s pantheon of friends. On this occasion he writes it up as a straight narrative rather that as an addition to the crowd gathering at the now postponed Brideshead Festival at Castle Howard. … Continue reading

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Brideshead @ 75: A N Wilson, The Oldie and The Folio Society

The Oldie has posted A N Wilson’s introduction to the Folio Society’s 2018 reprint of Brideshead Revisited. While this may not be denominated by Wilson or The Oldie as a commemoration of the novel’s 75th anniversary, we should be entitled … Continue reading

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Bright Younger People

In yesterday’s Mail on Sunday, Toby Young writes about his days at Oxford in the 1980s, energized to do so by a new book out later this week by Dafydd Jones. This is entitled Oxford, The Last Hurrah. The US … Continue reading

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Juneteenth Roundup

–A recent article in the Times newspaper criticizes plans for reopening some schools after lockdown with what it sees as a confusing “blend” of in-school live and at-home online teaching. Alex Massie opens the article with a quote from Evelyn … Continue reading

Posted in Auctions, Brideshead Revisited, Decline and Fall, Newspapers, Scott-King's Modern Europe, Waugh in Abyssinia, When the Going Was Good | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Castle Howard’s Brideshead Webinar on YouTube

The webinar produced by Castle Howard on the 75th anniversary of Brideshead Revisited’s publication (28 May 2020) has been posted on YouTube. This is entitled “Castle Howard and Brideshead: Fact, Fiction and In-Between” and is presented by Chris Ridgway, Castle … Continue reading

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Brideshead @ 75: The Economist and The Tablet

–The current issue of The Economist includes in its Arts section an article entitled “The Flyte club.” This is the magazine’s commemoration of the 75th anniversary of the publication of Brideshead in 1945. After a brief survey of the somewhat … Continue reading

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